Author Topic: Goldsmiths Community Centre and North Downham estate  (Read 66327 times)

Vic

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 87
    • View Profile
Re: Goldsmiths Community Centre and North Downham estate
« Reply #15 on: June 17, 2009, 08:44:04 PM »
Yes, I hope you have good enough weather for the Air Show Splinter. We can discuss it if we meet when I come to Dahnum in July.
Regards.
Vic.

derrick Durrantgoudhurst1

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 20
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Goldsmiths Community Centre and North Downham estate
« Reply #16 on: June 18, 2009, 02:21:23 AM »
Interesting to read your comments on "Biggin Hill" Splinter.My oldest brother Ernest,served there during the "Battle of Britain"in the RAF.Sometimes he got home in the evenings,I can remember my mother being worried about him,it was a much targeted area by the Luftwaffe.
Derek D.

Splinter

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 339
    • MSN Messenger - jef55@hotmail.co.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Goldsmiths Community Centre and North Downham estate
« Reply #17 on: June 18, 2009, 10:00:21 AM »
I Have always loved that area of Kent, i would also go fishing in Keston Ponds and later go to some of the pubs up there. The Jail did do some strong cider in fact you got some of the strongest in a wine glass as a pint would blow your head off. Vic i really hope that we meet up i will have to juggle my work around. Are you still coming by train?
Born in Pendragon Road 1954 Family lived in house since 1935 Bought in 1970/1 Still own it.

Vic

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 87
    • View Profile
Re: Goldsmiths Community Centre and North Downham estate
« Reply #18 on: June 18, 2009, 04:03:49 PM »
Yes, still coming by train. Due into Grove Park at 1451 on the 21 July and I leave from Grove Park at 1116 on 23 July.
On the evening of 21 July I intend to go walkabout on Downham and take photos at various places including Bren's requests.
On the morning of 22 I am going up the Top, further walkabout and hopefully meet Mike Burn and visit Ray Thorogood. Last time I was there I ate in a cafe up the Top during the day. I shall probably do the same this time. On the evening of 22 I hope to meet my mate Gordon from Bexley. Of course, all these things depend on the weather, although I shall catch a bus from Chinbrook to Northover so that should minimise the chances of a soaking!
I hope you can fit around that somehow Splinter? I'm nothing if not flexible so if you want me to change things to fit in with you I would be delighted.
Vic.

Brenda

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 880
    • View Profile
Re: Goldsmiths Community Centre and North Downham estate
« Reply #19 on: June 18, 2009, 10:28:05 PM »
And may your cameras be with you all the way!  A picture from the corner shop (the old Whites) look down towards Northover would be smashing.  Hint Hint

Loved Keston. That was one of our family outings from time to time.  Always crowded though, even all those years ago.

Bren

JSmith

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 228
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Goldsmiths Community Centre and North Downham estate
« Reply #20 on: June 19, 2009, 02:23:18 AM »
Vic. Your reference to up top (Downham) living on Churchdown we called it down the bottom, probably not unusual. Loved going to Biggin, air shows etc, took a  whole 1 Hour flying lesson with one of the clubs, to expensive 5 Pounds an half hour. Gosh I am jealous, working on  spitfires uncovering them,my favourite, it was the best. John  ;)
Born 1945 Churchdown road.

     You can take the Boy out of Downham,but you cant take Downham out of the Boy.

Splinter

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 339
    • MSN Messenger - jef55@hotmail.co.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Goldsmiths Community Centre and North Downham estate
« Reply #21 on: June 19, 2009, 07:03:03 AM »
In Pendragon we called the shops by the Tavern up top or top shops, the shops by Northover pub down bottom or bottom shops and the shops at the bottom of Downham Way the Broml;ey road shops. Vic i got your dates and will tell you nearer the time if i am ok. I have enquired if i can see the Gnats close up, at Biggin and talk to the owners of them as my Great Uncles Aircraft Company designed and built them (my surname is Folland) hope its ok to put your full name on this site, as i dont mind and i feel all on here are FRIENDS. (Some sites they slap your wrist for putting to much info about yourself. So i have got my hand out Mike !!!).
Born in Pendragon Road 1954 Family lived in house since 1935 Bought in 1970/1 Still own it.

Dickie eagle

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 375
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Goldsmiths Community Centre and North Downham estate
« Reply #22 on: June 19, 2009, 09:48:04 AM »
sorry Smudge,no Spits. in my collection, got some Spits with hooks at the stern only we called them Seafires    Tha little marvel I have a soft spot for was the Tiger Moth . Just to think Amy Johnson flew England to Oz in a little thing like that on may 5th. 1930 ,11,100 miles in 20 days.....with an open cockpit    dickie....................
Tristram Rd.,  M.N, RN. FAA. RFA,s  from 1941 to 1971  retired ex-MOD(Navy) , Moved to Downham in 1927 .! Travelled a bit With long spells ashore in USA, Malta, Southern India, Japan, NZ and OZ also attatched to Aus Navy ( HMAS Sydney)

Vic

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 87
    • View Profile
Re: Goldsmiths Community Centre and North Downham estate
« Reply #23 on: June 19, 2009, 11:18:35 AM »
Brenda,
Certainly I'll take a shot looking down Northover from outside where Whites was once. I've already taken a picture of that scene from outside what was Clark's the greengrocer. It takes in the sites of United Dairies, Morrell & Dixons, Boltons, Hammetts, Gunners and Wilsons. I e-mailed it to Mike, with a caption, and asked him if he would pass it on to you by e-mail. I suspect that he is very busy and hasn't managed it yet. However, I'll repeat the dose plus a lot more photographs
I remember that at Clark's they had a central payment kiosk and the chap serving would sing out the cost of articles bought like 'six and half the lady' as he shot the spuds into shopping basket or leather bound shopping bag - no plastic bags of course.. I remember how all the mothers in the war had to queue for ages, on a daily basis, outside all the food shops waiting to get the meagre rations. There was always great excitement if a small amount of tinned fruit became available 'on points' of course. Ration Books were as valuable as credit cards are now. The 'under the counter' practice was rife and if you were not a regular customer you didn't get the goods regardless of how long you had queued. It was the practice to send children off to join a queue at say, the Maypole (on the corner of Lancelot Road) to get some sugar whilst mother queued at Gunners to get the weekly bacon ration then she would hurry to take her place. What a fantastic generation of adults they were, those that kept the home front going through all these trials and tribulations; and they saw to it that their kids were brought up properly and their husbands had a good meal and a tidy home to come home to after work. Then, probably, half the night would be spent in the air raid shelter.
My mother lived to be 100. Like many others she had worked hard all her life (including war work at Woolwich Arsenal) and had more than her share of sudden grief through enemy air and ground action.
Perhaps we should place all parents of that generation in a 'Special People' Forum?
Vic.

Vic

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 87
    • View Profile
Re: Goldsmiths Community Centre and North Downham estate
« Reply #24 on: June 19, 2009, 04:25:06 PM »
Vic. Your reference to up top (Downham) living on Churchdown we called it down the bottom, probably not unusual. Loved going to Biggin, air shows etc, took a  whole 1 Hour flying lesson with one of the clubs, to expensive 5 Pounds an half hour. Gosh I am jealous, working on  spitfires uncovering them,my favourite, it was the best. John  ;)
Yes, I suppose it depended on where you lived relative to the hill in the middle of the estate as to whether it was 'bottom' or 'top'. The amazing thing was that all your neighbours knew exactly where you meant!
A little more on the Spitfires at Biggin Hill when I went there at week ends. There were several marks; the Mk 14, Mk 21 and the Mk 22. All with Griffon engines and some of the Mk 22s with contra props and Seafire after fuselage and tail. The identifying letters for 600 Sqn was RAG. one side of the fuselage roundel and the individual aircraft letter the other side. Most were still in wartime camouflage with the duck egg blue band around the rear fuselage and yellow outer wing leading edges. One Mk 22 was repainted sliver with a red mid fuselage band, highly polished, it was entered in the King's Cup Air Race. I never tired of hearing them start up (Coffman cartridge starter) and the beautiful rumble of the Rolls-Royce engines. As cadets we were allowed to refuel and replenish the cartridge magazines! Imagine that now in this crazy age of Health and Safety! Sometimes, but not often, we were given a trip in the rear seat of a Harvard. Each squadron had one for instrument flight training and examining.
Banging on as I was earlier about wartime shopping, I found a scrapbook with details of mid-war weekly ration entitlement per person. Check this: 3ozs sweets; 2 ozs of tea; 2 ozs of lard; 8 ozs of sugar; 2 ozs of butter; 2 ozs of marg; 4 ozs of cheese; 4 ozs of bacon; 3/4 lb of meat and one egg (if you were lucky). There are a lot of people in the UK who would benefit from such a rationing!
Vic.

Pauline

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 534
    • View Profile
Re: Goldsmiths Community Centre and North Downham estate
« Reply #25 on: June 20, 2009, 03:21:04 AM »

[/quote]
There are a lot of people in the UK who would benefit from such a rationing!
Vic.
[/quote]

You are so right Vic, in Australia the number of obese people is amazing, and their children too.  How can parents want their kids to suffer as they do?  I am told the reason the so called 'poor' people get takeaways is because there is no wastage, they don't have to buy all the other foods to make a meal, and so takeaways are cheaper in the long run. When I were a gel the only takeaways were from the fish and chip shop, and then very few and far between.  Mum wasn't the greatest cook in the world, but the food was fresh - no frozen stuff in those days.  I remember it took me ages to convince Mum to buy frozen peas.
Born 1944 in Geraint Road.  Launcelot and Churchdown Schools.  Moved to Western Australia in 1988.
Two children, 6 grandchildren, 3 dogs, hundreds of snakes, spiders and lizards.

Splinter

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 339
    • MSN Messenger - jef55@hotmail.co.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Goldsmiths Community Centre and North Downham estate
« Reply #26 on: June 20, 2009, 06:49:47 AM »
Well on Downham all our Kitchens had Larders and food was bought every day, so no problem about sell by dates or use by dates. Also you ate what was there or go hungry. I find takeaways not very filling, i am hungry within a few hours so thats why all those who live on them you see eating crisps or other things to fill them up. no wonder they get fat. I suppose i am lucky, i can eat anything and dont put on weight.
Born in Pendragon Road 1954 Family lived in house since 1935 Bought in 1970/1 Still own it.

Brenda

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 880
    • View Profile
Re: Goldsmiths Community Centre and North Downham estate
« Reply #27 on: June 20, 2009, 07:35:04 AM »
Keep those war reminiscences coming. I love 'em.

Vic, the big hill I sped down was coming from Blackheath down to Lee Green. I have no idea what the name of it was. 

Yes, Up the Top and Down the Bottom and, for my friend in Whitefoot Lane, Over the Road which was the group of shops in Verdant Lane.  And yes, we all knew what we were talking about, didn't we?

I think the less financially stable folk (e.g. the unemployed/unemployable/not-so-smart (perhaps) folk, have a tendency to fill up on bread  (probably white)  and potatoes rather than meat and veg and fruit and that adds to the weight problem. Also, there seems to be at least one generation that has no idea how to cook a meal with fresh ingredients and nobody seems to have learnt how to make a good, tasty

I have to say that I have been horrified by the price of meat in the shops. We grow our own beef, as you know.  If we didn't, I can assure you we'd be having a few more vegetarian meals because the cost of meat is horrendous now. Again, there is a whole generation that doesn't know how to cook the less expensive cuts.

As for takeaways: I can say without a word of a lie that I have never had a Big Mac. I have had Kentucky Fried twice in 35 years and I hope I never have to endure it a third time.  It is years and years since I had fish and chips. Last time I went into a fish and chip shop was when Syd and I had been on a long journey and he wanted to eat.  I looked at the food, smelled the fat, bought Syd's and went off into another shop to buy a banana for myself!

And if you think, having read that, I am thin - think again.

Bren

Vic

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 87
    • View Profile
Re: Goldsmiths Community Centre and North Downham estate
« Reply #28 on: June 20, 2009, 03:13:14 PM »
Brenda,
That was Lee Road. It runs down from Blackheath Village to Lee Green past Priory Road - and lots of other side turnings.
I was in our local Mac Donalds this morning. I don't eat their food, but they serve very good coffee (from beans) with organic milk - not that I'm an organic freak - at a very reasonable price. For the same size cup in Costa Coffee - a quasi Italian set up - it is nearly three times as much! Being from Dahnum, I watch costs carefully! There was the usual gaggle of obese couples and kids in there, and a surprising number of what are known as 'Senior Citizens'. If you close your ears to the dreadful music it's an education to observe the present and up and coming adult generations!
Vic.

Vic

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 87
    • View Profile
Re: Goldsmiths Community Centre and North Downham estate
« Reply #29 on: June 20, 2009, 08:12:24 PM »
Brenda,
That was Lee Road. It runs down from Blackheath Village to Lee Green past Priory Road - and lots of other side turnings.
I was in our local Mac Donalds this morning. I don't eat their food, but they serve very good coffee (from beans) with organic milk - not that I'm an organic freak - at a very reasonable price. For the same size cup in Costa Coffee - a quasi Italian set up - it is nearly three times as much! Being from Dahnum, I watch costs carefully! There was the usual gaggle of obese couples and kids in there, and a surprising number of what are known as 'Senior Citizens'. If you close your ears to the dreadful music it's an education to observe the present and up and coming adult generations!
Vic.
I don't know what happened here, but only a bit of my last narrative was posted - the rest has disappeared into thin air.
I'll try again!
Having seen some estate agents adverts for 'apartments' on Downham I wondered how the interior of the flats have been updated. I remember the larder. It was over the coal bunker which was on the balcony. The scullery, my mother never called it the kitchen, had just a cold water tap, a large white sink and a wooden draining board. We had a largeish Hotpoint cooker; smaller flats had the Jackson cooker with three hotplates and cooker. The scullery table was the clothes wringer folded down.The bathroom had just cold water and on bath nights my father carried hot coals through from the living room on a shovel to start the fire in the copper in the bathroom. We never used the rather hopeless pump, but scooped the water from the copper into the bath using a large saucepan. The WC was on the balcony it had plain brick walls and it was absolutely taters out there in the winter - no one lingered for long. Somehow, the cistern never froze up. I would like to have just a peek into No 17 Merlin now. I could just ring the bell on the off chance I suppose, but the main flats entrance has a coded security door now so I wouldn't get past it. We left our bikes and tandem in the passage behind the door years ago. No one objected and nothing was nicked. For all its unsophisticated, cold and draughty nature, I can't remember ever feeling that we were really roughing it in the flat even after I had got use to more comfort and convenience in foster homes on wartime evacuation.