Downham Online Discussion

Forums => General Discussion => Topic started by: Splinter on April 14, 2009, 11:29:28 PM

Title: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Splinter on April 14, 2009, 11:29:28 PM
Since coming on to this site(which is great) i am amazed where people have moved to. their in Oz and Canada. But could i ask What made you move so far away. Was it all you dreampt about. What do you miss. And mainly what were your gains. But what amazes me, no matter where you are in this World. Downham is still a focal point to all of us and always will be.
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Brenda on April 15, 2009, 06:21:43 AM
Oooh, what a lot of story telling you have invited.

For starters, we (Syd and I and two children) could not afford to get into the housing market in England in the early 70s.   We were living in a council flat in Kennington which was not the best place to be - not like Downham, I can tell you.  House prices suddenly zoomed up and we knew we didn't have a chance of getting our own place. Banks etc confirmed it!  Add to that, my sister had already come out to Oz with her family and they had managed to get their first home fairly quickly.  My mother was already in Oz with them.

So, I suppose we could sum it up by saying our reasons were family, finances and housing and the hope of a better future for the four of us.

We came out with four suitcases and four smallish crates and lived in a migrant hostel for 9 months.  I immediately started earning four times as much as I did in England so we were able to save and by the end of that 9 months we had enough to put a deposit on a house. 

I often think what might have happened had we stayed. I suppose we'd have been able to buy the flat eventually and then been able to get out of that area into something better.  Most of our friends in  England seem to have achieved it.  But I hated living in Kennington. Hated the noise and the dirt and not having a garden and the aggression.  I'm glad we got out and I'm glad we're here.

What do I miss? Well, the old friends naturally. Extended family although most of them have gone now.  Bluebells at Westerham. Antiquity and history. The green of rural England. Rain! Crocuses popping up in spring.  Kent in blossom time.  The smell of the sea (smells different out here). Faggots.  Dandelion and Burdock ...



Bren


 
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Pauline on April 15, 2009, 09:47:37 AM

I

What do I miss? Well, the old friends naturally. Extended family although most of them have gone now.  Bluebells at Westerham. Antiquity and history. The green of rural England. Rain! Crocuses popping up in spring.  Kent in blossom time.  The smell of the sea (smells different out here). Faggots.  Dandelion and Burdock ...



Bren


 

Yes all of the above, mostly the history. But also proper Bisto gravy, proper chocolate.  But I love the seafood, especially swordfish, prawns that look like lobsters.

Why did we move here?  A good question.  We had a lovely house, and both had good jobs.  We tell everyone it was "because Jill's dad died". 
Jill and Kevin lived near us when we first got married, and although we had both moved away, we kept in touch.  Jill's brothers both lived in Perth.  When Jill's dad died, he left a little money to all 3 children.  The brothers used theirs to pay for Kevin Jill and the kids to come to Perth for a holiday.  They came back with glowing tales, and decided to move here.  We looked into it, and thought "Why not?"  So we came a few months after them, and stayed with them until we got a house.  We don't see them much any more, too many other things to do.  We came in 1988, no migrant hostels then, and we had to pay full fare for us and my son Peter Jnr.  My daughter Nadine had married Gareth before we came here, and they arrived here 3 months after us.  We would have probably still been in the same house back in England, netiher of us would have had the same jobs because both company's went out of business later.  Nadine and Gareth would have had a 2 up 2 down in Sheerness, and young Peter also.  Here they have lovely homes, the kids go to good schools, and everyone is happy. And because of the climate we see much more of them, and everyone esle.
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Splinter on April 15, 2009, 06:58:11 PM
Thank you for your replys very interesting. If there are certain products that you and probably a majority of ex pats cant buy. Why does`nt somebody import them ( thats i thought for a business) These days it could all be done online !!!
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Brenda on April 15, 2009, 11:42:58 PM
I would once have added Marmite to my list of things missed but it can now be bought over here.  Thank goodness!  My friend who recently visited brought over some bags of sherbert lemons.  Australian confectionery is not of such a high standard as English.  There is a small shop in Ballarat where English confectionery is sold but it is limited and very, very expensive.

There are selections of imported English food on the supermarket shelves e.g. Tate and Lyalls Golden Syrup.  Glad too, we can get Branston Pickle.  Australian pickled products are very sweet.

Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Frank (hutchsky) on April 16, 2009, 02:30:21 AM
I worked for Otis Elevators on the refurbishment of the Northern Line and our team had a lot of Ozies and they was full of praise of Australia. So one day I rung my wife up and said I have been to Australia House and we can get assisted passage to West Oz (10 pound poms) She agreed to go, we was buying a nice home in Wellmeadow Rd Hither Green, couple of cars and good jobs and of course family we had 2 boys 2/3 years old. We went through the process with fights with my parents over leaving the UK, but I remember that they wanted to come to Oz in the early 50s so it was their in my brain. We left the UK in February 1968 by boat (Castel Felice Sitmar Line) and arrived in Fremantle late March, we came the long way round due to Suez being closed. On arrival it was bucketing down with rain not ever seen anything like it and the migrant hostel at Point Water was Tin Huts and every one had their meals in a big Hall. Talk about walking back in time, after London This was like an Old Western town, all that was needed was tie up rails for your horses. First job was to buy a car and move out, I was working after a couple of days. But did not look back after a couple of months and love the place. The things I miss of course, the History, (only 200 years here) and country side, can get English food and sweets with shops selling just that (Birds Custard, even the Grand Kids ask for Birds Custard) would have travelled a lot more, lots to see in that side of the world history wise. I still find the English TV programs the Best, we have a lot of USA rubbish, and the Oz Shows, well more rubbish, apart from a few( Not a TV Fan) My Brother and sisters have made visits. One lives in Sidcup, another in Gravesend ( Ex Churchdown Girl) and baby sis in Spain. I suppose in would be perfect to live in both Countries, as some do. My wife Janet, all her family now live here, 4 sisters 1 brother Mum & Dad, cousins and aunts and uncles They are from Bristol, must be a harder place to live than London.
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Frank (hutchsky) on April 16, 2009, 03:48:26 AM
The first year in Oz I might add (1968)we had an earthquake and a cyclone and that did not seemed to worry us too much, the weather is the big plus and day light saving!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! big bush fire here over the easter weekend, its a way of life!
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Dickie eagle on April 16, 2009, 11:41:04 AM
in the late 30's my future looked like Music and possibly the BBC ........!  then someone started a war ( the family joke was my Mum in Law jokingly blamed me ). It was well under way when I got dragged in but I enjoyed the countries and places (The friendly ones ) visited somehow the horrible Japs we were fighting then were nothing like the courteous and warm people I lived with after the cessation of hostilities, and Kure, Kobe. Sassebo. and the Air Station at Iwakuni was an enlightening experience . Must say I was not much taken by Malta which in their own language was very "Mush Tiab "  (No Good). Time spent at sea was a perfect Bonus and the seas and oceans were bridges to lots of other wonderful lands, including Oz          dickie..............
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: christine on April 16, 2009, 04:05:01 PM
To everyone in faraway places - it lifted me no end to hear of the lovely things you say about the old country - if only everyone could read the Downham site then they too might be more positive about England.  I, too, planned to move to Oz back in the late sixties under the old scheme but as the papers were completed for onward posting to Australia House, along came Stuart and four months later I was engaged and now coming up to our 38th anniversary. I do, though, have somewhere in Australia a branch of my mother's family - her mum's sister emigrated to Parramatta at the turn of the last century, set up home, and enjoyed a very nice lifestyle (another sister went, I believe, to live in Alberta, Canada - she also enjoying a good lifestyle). My grandmother stayed in the UK and struggled all her life to make ends meet! Bren - don't think I remember you telling me how you got to Oz but have to say that Kennington is now 'trendy' and expensive as is most of London and Greater London. Splinter -thanks for all the ideas you come up with and for getting people to put so much info about themselves on the site - it has all made interesting reading - you will get your 'hero' badge before long!
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Brenda on April 16, 2009, 10:59:15 PM
Oh gosh, Kennington is trendy?  Blimey.  Look, I am sure if we had been living in a nice suburb with a house and garden, we would not have left England. But where we were was pretty rough and not a good place to bring up children and, as I said, the housing market went mad and left us right behind.  My job as a nurse was always poorly paid and that didn't help.

Chris, you are so right. Splinter has made a wonderful and very welcome addition to our online community.  Keep up the good work, John.

Hutch, I have heard that many migrants who went to Perth in the 60s found it to be very much a one-horse town and very behind in comparison to England.  A lot turned round and went home as soon as they could.  Those who stuck it out were generally pretty glad they did. 

The migrant hostel we went to in 1974 was a great improvement on the tin huts (my sister was in a hostel like that too).

Dickie dear, do tell us more about the thwarted musical career.

Bren
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Splinter on April 16, 2009, 11:35:05 PM
Thank you all for those kind words. After reading about all the items that you cant get in OZ i think we should start sending FOOD parcels to you. Dont worry i still have plenty of new subjects for us all to discuss in the future. Got to go to bed now early start tomorrow, speak to you all soon . John.(Bye the way I drive an artic for a living )
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Dickie eagle on April 16, 2009, 11:52:43 PM
Chris was it you who had an Uncle Harry after a fracas with a Chinamans pigtail ? if so did his wife live near Portsmouth, and what was his surname ??      dickie ............ um! Brenda, surprise cos even parts of Bermondsey are now Trendy  like Tanner St., and Snowsfields etc......
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Frank (hutchsky) on April 17, 2009, 02:06:23 AM
Thank you all for those kind words. After reading about all the items that you cant get in OZ i think we should start sending FOOD parcels to you. Don't worry i still have plenty of new subjects for us all to discuss in the future. Got to go to bed now early start tomorrow, speak to you all soon . John.(Bye the way I drive an artic for a living )
John, I have driven Artics a lot of my working life, in England I drove for Chelsea Flour Mills (Cohen Flour Mills) in Long Lane BRS depot/Lorries, Alliance Haulage in Brixton, carting for United Glass, and drove the Artic at Haywood Pickles at Peckham, drove all over the UK. I drove for a company here Brambles Manford, and drove all over West Australia. I got a shock in the late 60s because a lot of roads out of Perth were gravel and I got stranded at times in the wet. Our Mining, North was booming and driving along river beds. open and shut farm/station gates crossing rivers was a real wake up from my UK driving, and on top of that, repaired our own tyres and trucks when they broke down. The Loads had to be watched all the time, with the rough roads. The roads are a lot better now, the rains can still cause problems with flooding,and the heat, nothing like changing and repairing a tyre in 40 plus heat. 27 punctures was the best I had on a 2000 mile trip! the norm was about 5/6. Every 60 miles (100KMS) you had to stopped and check your tyres, great fun, the boss paided us a hour for every tyre I repaired. I also did a stint on Road Trains but was away from home too much( More wheels but better tyres by then). No log Books and an 18 hour day was the norm. I think I put in 25 hours at times. I drove at times, for hours without seeing another vehicle, a big country
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Pauline on April 17, 2009, 09:35:40 AM
Chris was it you who had an Uncle Harry after a fracas with a Chinamans pigtail ? if so did his wife live near Portsmouth, and what was his surname ??      dickie ............ um! Brenda, surprise cos even parts of Bermondsey are now Trendy  like Tanner St., and Snowsfields etc......

Hi Dickie, that was my Uncle.  His wife and kids lived in Plumstead until my Gran packed her off to Australia to join him.
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Pauline on April 17, 2009, 09:41:00 AM
Thank you for your replys very interesting. If there are certain products that you and probably a majority of ex pats cant buy. Why does`nt somebody import them ( thats i thought for a business) These days it could all be done online !!!

Unfortunately you cannot import milk products, or nuts.  There is a shop in London Court that has a heap of stuff, a bit expensive though, so I just go now and again to get something I occasionally get a real longing for - like jaffa cakes and fig rolls, which are available sometimes in the supermarkets.  But there are heavy restrictions on food stuffs that can be imported. We cannot even bring in honey to WA from other states,f and I also think there is some restrictions on fruit and plants from other states.
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Splinter on April 17, 2009, 05:02:14 PM
Yes Frank i know what you Boys did years ago on the road was heroic. Iv`e been at it for 25 years (would of got less for murder) I enjoyed it then but today i just do it to make pennies as they say. I have never had to change a tyre. JUST MAKE A PHONE CALL AN THEY COME OUT AND DO IT FOR YOU . Health and Safety rules now. But as long as i keep my health i`ve got 10 more years before i retire. Heres a thought for you ex-pats when you dream of a night and you remember it and it was centred in a place,was that in Oz or UK ?
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Dickie eagle on April 17, 2009, 06:12:53 PM
Thanks Chris, a coincidence with another Harry. That still leaves me looking for Harry Linihan & co. although I did manage the returned Anzac with two daughters still in UK., I'll check the Aus phone directories.    dickie .............
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Dickie eagle on April 17, 2009, 09:48:33 PM
retire?   worse thing I ever did ,  mind you that was in 1974 ,I do not know how I ever found time to work,and once retired you never get any holidays or days off         dickie.......................
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Splinter on April 18, 2009, 07:02:36 AM
The way things are going i will only be able to afford to semi-retire, not like the people who caused my problem ie Banks and Mr Brown.
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Brenda on April 18, 2009, 11:06:45 AM

 Heres a thought for you ex-pats when you dream of a night and you remember it and it was centred in a place,was that in Oz or UK ?
[/quote]

Oh my, what a pertinent question (note, I did not say 'impertinent!) You see, Splinter, I often dream of 'home'.  I will often be turning the corner into Durham Hill from - say - Woodbank Rd and see No 40 as it used to be.  I have often wept in my dreams just to see it.  I last dreamt of it a few nights ago (and yes, I invariably remember my dreams). I was in the kitchen and looked outside to see two elephants stepping over the back fences and walking down the road via the gardens. True! 

Another recurring dream is of waiting for the 124 bus at St Lawrence's, Catford but finding the bus-stops have changed or the buses go without me and I'm trying desperately to get home but can't.  Doesn't take much imagination to know what that represents, does it?

Lewisham pops up frequently too but is usually much changed from what I remember.

London also features quite frequently and in these dreams I am walking around recognising places such as St Paul's or train stations etc. People ask me where I'm from and I tell them "I used to live here" and then I get this really amazing feeling of knowing I am in the wrong place and I need to get back to Australia.  Again, doesn't take much imagination to know what all that is about.

I look forward to the dream experience of you other ex-pats.

Bren
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Pauline on April 18, 2009, 01:37:10 PM

 Heres a thought for you ex-pats when you dream of a night and you remember it and it was centred in a place,was that in Oz or UK ?

Oh my, what a pertinent question (note, I did not say 'impertinent!) You see, Splinter, I often dream of 'home'.  I will often be turning the corner into Durham Hill from - say - Woodbank Rd and see No 40 as it used to be.  I have often wept in my dreams just to see it.  I last dreamt of it a few nights ago (and yes, I invariably remember my dreams). I was in the kitchen and looked outside to see two elephants stepping over the back fences and walking down the road via the gardens. True! 

Another recurring dream is of waiting for the 124 bus at St Lawrence's, Catford but finding the bus-stops have changed or the buses go without me and I'm trying desperately to get home but can't.  Doesn't take much imagination to know what that represents, does it?

Lewisham pops up frequently too but is usually much changed from what I remember.

London also features quite frequently and in these dreams I am walking around recognising places such as St Paul's or train stations etc. People ask me where I'm from and I tell them "I used to live here" and then I get this really amazing feeling of knowing I am in the wrong place and I need to get back to Australia.  Again, doesn't take much imagination to know what all that is about.

I look forward to the dream experience of you other ex-pats.

Bren
[/quote]

The only dream I have of England is actually a nightmare, where I am in England and I can't get back to Australia!
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Splinter on April 18, 2009, 04:27:42 PM
I think i spent half my youth waiting for a 124 Bus and that was a nightmare.
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Splinter on April 18, 2009, 11:33:23 PM
Blimey Dickie you retired in 1974!!! Thats 34 years ago Plus 65 Makes you 99 ?  Oh well just waiting for the Queens Telegram Then. Best Wishes.
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Brenda on April 19, 2009, 08:00:14 AM
I think i spent half my youth waiting for a 124 Bus and that was a nightmare.

I shall never forget waiting for a bus one very cold winter's night outside Lewisham Hospital.  Waited so long that when it came along, I was too cold to get moving fast enough to get on and it went without me.

Bren
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Splinter on April 19, 2009, 09:26:29 AM
In the days of London Transport, Buses only went on certain routes on the estate. It was Downham Way 36B and 141 and 124 for Northover, but now they go all over the estate and you don`t have to wait that long for them. So thats one improvement.
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Dickie eagle on April 19, 2009, 09:10:50 PM
Splint my old son I AM NOWHERE NEAR 99 cor  *!'@#& me....... I am a mere Youf    dickie...............X
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Brenda on April 19, 2009, 10:54:37 PM
In the days of London Transport, Buses only went on certain routes on the estate. It was Downham Way 36B and 141 and 124 for Northover, but now they go all over the estate and you don`t have to wait that long for them. So thats one improvement.

Yes indeed,  and that would have saved me the long walk to Bromley Road early on Sunday mornings to catch a bus to Lewisham Hospital because the service from Downham didn't start until later.

Anyone else remember when the 36B and  141 were Nos 69 and 179?

Bren
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Pauline on April 20, 2009, 03:08:00 AM
In the days of London Transport, Buses only went on certain routes on the estate. It was Downham Way 36B and 141 and 124 for Northover, but now they go all over the estate and you don`t have to wait that long for them. So thats one improvement.

Yes indeed,  and that would have saved me the long walk to Bromley Road early on Sunday mornings to catch a bus to Lewisham Hospital because the service from Downham didn't start until later.

Anyone else remember when the 36B and  141 were Nos 69 and 179?

Bren
I'm afraid so Brenda. I remember waiting for one to come to take me down to Churchdown.  And if I missed one it would be quicker to go over Durham Hill than wait for another, which may come in 2 minutes, or half and hour.
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Dickie eagle on April 20, 2009, 10:24:46 AM
Remember WHAT Bus ????, Bren Angel I used the No. 52 ,  54, or 72 & 74 trams or the 35 from the Marquis of Granby    dickie....................
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Splinter on April 20, 2009, 02:54:35 PM
It`s been so long since i caught a Bus i wouldn`t know what side of the road to stand on. When i was young my Nan lost me in Woolies in Catford i was about 4 then. The whole of Catford was searched by the Police everybody in a panic. The only child found was in Eltham Police Stn . Yes it was me, i lost Nan so went home on the 124 Bus i Knew where to get on the bus by the toilets in Catford but didn`t know where to get off so it took me to Eltham. I do remember i used to go downstairs on the bus (nan couldn`t get upstairs) and at the front behind the driver was a hump so i could stand on that and be able to look out. Silly what you remember isn`t it.
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Pauline on April 21, 2009, 01:50:54 AM
It`s been so long since i caught a Bus i wouldn`t know what side of the road to stand on. When i was young my Nan lost me in Woolies in Catford i was about 4 then. The whole of Catford was searched by the Police everybody in a panic. The only child found was in Eltham Police Stn . Yes it was me, i lost Nan so went home on the 124 Bus i Knew where to get on the bus by the toilets in Catford but didn`t know where to get off so it took me to Eltham. I do remember i used to go downstairs on the bus (nan couldn`t get upstairs) and at the front behind the driver was a hump so i could stand on that and be able to look out. Silly what you remember isn`t it.

Mum and Dad would get the 149 or the 179 to visit my Gran up the Old Kent Road.  Coming back I would fall alseep on the bus, and Dad would carry me all the way home from the bus stop!
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Frank (hutchsky) on April 21, 2009, 01:24:13 PM
In the days of London Transport, Buses only went on certain routes on the estate. It was Downham Way 36B and 141 and 124 for Northover, but now they go all over the estate and you don`t have to wait that long for them. So thats one improvement.

Yes indeed,  and that would have saved me the long walk to Bromley Road early on Sunday mornings to catch a bus to Lewisham Hospital because the service from Downham didn't start until later.

Anyone else remember when the 36B and  141 were Nos 69 and 179?

Bren
I would catch them buses most days to go  to work in the city to Grove Park, then by Train. In my army days I would hire a car for a week then back to public transport when on leave. All my friends lived in the Catford area, and when courting, well walked home from Catford many a night, all night buses did run but every hour I would miss them every time, we lived in the Brangbourne Flats then. The other service I used, was the 47 which I caught out side a cycle shop on Bromley Rd opp, Wollies to go to my Grand parents home in Crown Lane Bromley. I do remember the trams, but not the numbers.
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Splinter on April 21, 2009, 05:22:29 PM
I had to catch a train from Grove Park to Waterloo from the age of 11 that was 1965 and then with ork to the city so that was upto 1979. Does any body remember the Double decker Train that was on the Dartford Loop Line Via Hither Green. I don`t know when it stopped running.
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: christine on April 21, 2009, 07:00:41 PM
I had to catch a train from Grove Park to Waterloo from the age of 11 that was 1965 and then with ork to the city so that was upto 1979. Does any body remember the Double decker Train that was on the Dartford Loop Line Via Hither Green. I don`t know when it stopped running.
Splinter - I remember it well.  I used to live in Lee Green before I got married which was on the Dartford Loop. My husband actually mentioned this train to a friend now working on Crossrail and they didn't believe him - all in the past now, like slam door trains and trams - oh here we go again...........
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Splinter on April 21, 2009, 08:08:55 PM
I got Told that the double decker could only use that line because the Bridges were higher, on all other routes it could hit a bridge, They also had Ladies Only Compartments.
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Dickie eagle on April 21, 2009, 10:37:53 PM
Mostly for Brenda, or Keith's family if they are around but my Grandchildrens addresses are   :-

           Daniel Ophof , 16, Dovercourt Rd., appartment 21., QLD Twoong  4066., Brisbane                 


           Amanda Ophof .,  19-13  Upper esplanade., 6230 Bunbury       


      Only wish I were there with them now it's cooling off a shade        dickie .........................
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: christine on April 21, 2009, 10:38:33 PM
I got Told that the double decker could only use that line because the Bridges were higher, on all other routes it could hit a bridge, They also had Ladies Only Compartments.
You're absolutely right - there were 'ladies only' compartments - always very useful on those hot summer days when the rest of the train was full and you could sneak in and get a seat although it was usually only one single compartment - not the whole carriage.  Don't know about the bridges being higher - just asked himself downstairs and he thought there were no bridges on that route but he said there would have to be no constraints to allow that particular train to run on any route.  Thinking about it Splinter, rail travel nowadays for all its problems is tons better than in our younger days -with air conditioning, cctv, sliding doors, disabled access etc. and, best of all, no smoking.  All people complain about now is the fact that they might have to stand!
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Brenda on April 21, 2009, 10:58:17 PM
Love your latest anecdote, Splinter.  Had me chuckling.  I got lost in Woolworths in Lewisham when I was around the same age.  I can remember how terrified I was when I realised Mum wasn't there.  I think she had stopped to look at something  and I'd walked on.  Every woman seemed to have the same brown coat on and I kept running up to find only a stranger. Being very, very shy, I was too scared to tell anyone I was lost and didn't cry, but oh my goodness, my poor little heart was racing.  Then I heard Mum yell, "Brenda, wherever you are, stand still and I'll find you."  And she did of course. Tell you what though, it was a long time before I felt safe going shopping again.

Bren
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Brenda on April 21, 2009, 11:00:58 PM
  Thinking about it Splinter, rail travel nowadays for all its problems is tons better than in our younger days -with air conditioning, cctv, sliding doors, disabled access etc. and, best of all, no smoking.  All people complain about now is the fact that they might have to stand!
[/quote]

Yes Chris, many is the time I stood on one leg only from Grove Park to London Bridge because there was no room to get the other one down!

Bren
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Splinter on April 22, 2009, 01:16:33 AM
One very hot day i was about 12 then. The train from Bromley North brokedown at Grove Park, so they all got off went to the other platform to catch a train coming from Orpington so it was very very crowded. I remember going through New Cross and then everything went blank as i passed out, i then found myself on a seat with a lady asking if i was OK. Very embarassing. Those types of things you never forget no matter how old you get. I still cringe about the thought even now as i tell the story, silly i know.
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Pauline on April 22, 2009, 01:52:04 AM
I got Told that the double decker could only use that line because the Bridges were higher, on all other routes it could hit a bridge, They also had Ladies Only Compartments.
You're absolutely right - there were 'ladies only' compartments - always very useful on those hot summer days when the rest of the train was full and you could sneak in and get a seat although it was usually only one single compartment - not the whole carriage.  Don't know about the bridges being higher - just asked himself downstairs and he thought there were no bridges on that route but he said there would have to be no constraints to allow that particular train to run on any route.  Thinking about it Splinter, rail travel nowadays for all its problems is tons better than in our younger days -with air conditioning, cctv, sliding doors, disabled access etc. and, best of all, no smoking.  All people complain about now is the fact that they might have to stand!

What about those terrible greasy seats, just where your hed would be. UGH!!!!
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Splinter on April 22, 2009, 10:04:15 AM
Yes . the seats on those trains were disgusting and the floors were so filthy that you had to wipe your feet when you left the train. I think the most frightening thing that happened on a train was at Hither Green going up town a man jumped in just as the train was leaving and caught his foot at the bottom of the door so it only half shut i could see him struggling to free his foot, then before anybody could do anything, he opened the door the wind caught it nearly pulling him out with it, he got held onto, somebody pulled the emergency stop chain and we shuddered to a halt on the bridge where our line goes over the Hayes line just outside Lewisham. The guard came took the mans details ( just remembered in those days you saw ladders hooked onto walls at the side of the track, he used that to get into the train). We sat there for over an hour all trains stopped. the train then slowly went to St John`s Stn and stopped .( never stopped there before always went fast through it) We all had to get off, the train went away on its own and we caught the next train to stop. So due to one idiot who nearly got killed. We all ended up 90 mins late.
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Pauline on April 23, 2009, 01:50:01 AM
Yes . the seats on those trains were disgusting and the floors were so filthy that you had to wipe your feet when you left the train. I think the most frightening thing that happened on a train was at Hither Green going up town a man jumped in just as the train was leaving and caught his foot at the bottom of the door so it only half shut i could see him struggling to free his foot, then before anybody could do anything, he opened the door the wind caught it nearly pulling him out with it, he got held onto, somebody pulled the emergency stop chain and we shuddered to a halt on the bridge where our line goes over the Hayes line just outside Lewisham. The guard came took the mans details ( just remembered in those days you saw ladders hooked onto walls at the side of the track, he used that to get into the train). We sat there for over an hour all trains stopped. the train then slowly went to St John`s Stn and stopped .( never stopped there before always went fast through it) We all had to get off, the train went away on its own and we caught the next train to stop. So due to one idiot who nearly got killed. We all ended up 90 mins late.

I remember being extremely miffed when someone jumped in from of an underground train and made me late for work.  I guess being young (17yo) and unaware of worldly woes (being cocooned on Downhma made us immune from others sufferings) I never even considered what had brought a person to such a state that they would prefer to jump in front of a train and end it all.
Title: Re: MOVING TO FAR OFF PLACES
Post by: Splinter on April 23, 2009, 10:17:26 AM
I think its in your mental makeup. To kill yourself also depends on the way life is dealt to you. I would never deplore anybody who is dying anyway and all they have to look forward to is pain and suffering. We dont let animals suffer so i think we sometimes have to change our mindset on life. Remember we are dying from the moment we were born.